A pilot study on the usefulness of information and education campaign materials in enhancing the knowledge, attitude and practice on rabies in rural Sri Lanka

  • Gino C. Matibag Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
  • Yoshihide Ohbayashi Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
  • Koji Kanda Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
  • Hiroko Yamashina Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
  • W.R. Bandula Kumara Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
  • I.N. Gamini Perera Department of Health Services-Central Province, Kandy, PO Box 163, Sangaraja, Mawatha, Kandy
  • D.D. Niranjala De Silva Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
  • G. S. Panduka De S. Gunawardena Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
  • Ananda Jayasinghe Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya
  • Rossana A. Ditangco Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
  • Hiko Tamashiro Department of Global Health and Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita-15 Nishi-7, Kita-Ku, Sapporo 060-8638 Hokkaido
Keywords: knowledge, attitude, health practice, Sri Lanka

Abstract

Background: Rabies remains endemic in Sri Lanka despite a strong government patronized anti-rabies campaign. Personal, cultural or religious beliefs have been thought to influence health practices that could render rabies prevalent in the country. Methodology: The knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of 580 household heads/members from Nuwara Eliya District, Sri Lanka, regarding rabies were explored through a structured questionnaire. An improvement/deterioration in their knowledge and practices after the use of information and education campaign (IEC) materials was assessed through a repeat exploration at an interval of four weeks. Results: Respondents showed inclination toward animal birth control (60%) rather than elimination methods (24%). There was disparity between pet owners‟ enthusiasm to take pets for rabies inoculation (57%) and their ability to show dog vaccination cards (40%). Almost twice more pet owners than non-pet owners believed that it is their responsibility to control the population of roaming pet dogs (aOR=1.78; 95% CI: 1.14 to 2.76). The rabies leaflets were very effective in informing the people on how to deal with rabid animals, the earliest schedule for anti-rabies vaccine (ARV), and repeat vaccination. Conclusions: Awareness and proper attitude toward rabies management and canine population control are adequate among the rural Sinhalese and Buddhist populations of Sri Lanka; however, their current health practices should be improved. The rabies KAP could be further enhanced through the use of IEC materials.
Published
2009-02-01
How to Cite
1.
Matibag GC, Ohbayashi Y, Kanda K, Yamashina H, Kumara WB, Perera IG, De SilvaDN, De S. GunawardenaGSP, Jayasinghe A, Ditangco RA, Tamashiro H (2009) A pilot study on the usefulness of information and education campaign materials in enhancing the knowledge, attitude and practice on rabies in rural Sri Lanka. J Infect Dev Ctries 3:055-064. doi: 10.3855/jidc.106
Section
Original Articles